"There is always a philosophy for lack of courage."—Albert Camus

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Shucking The Awe

The Ten Commandments are the subject of the day, with the omniscient Supreme Court deigning to distinguish between the Moral Ten and the Ethical Ten, the Universal Ten and the Parochial Ten, the Societal Ten and the Religious Ten. If you ask me, God still wins on points, 10-9.

I'll be honest with you. I'm not ready yet to ponder the legal question. I just can't imagine making a decision to have the Ten Commandments taken down from any place at any time. Where is the respect? Where is the awe?

Yes, my friends. AWE.

6 comments:

Lawjedi said...

Loved the comments over at Liberty Files about downing two tablets & Rehnquist's decision not to retire. In truth, it's either legal or it isn't, and the court's decision is based upon what the person placing the display had in mind. Which seems to depart from prior reasoning that it was the reasonable effect on the viewer that counted. I'm still deciding if this is a sign of good or bad things to come.

But it was a pretty "safe" resolution, meaning the logic was weak, and the conclusions reached didn't give us any guidance as to the law.

Tlaloc said...

"I just can't imagine making a decision to have the Ten Commandments taken down from any place at any time. Where is the respect?"

Forcing your religion on others is hardly a form of respect. Respect involves acknowledging that while you may love your religion dearly it is not the religion of the country, nor should it be. The religion of the country is no religion so that the religion of the people may remain free of coercion and inhibition.

That's respect for the traditions and people of the United States.

A superfluous man said...

They're secularists, those ignoble Justices who--certainly in the warped cases of Stevens & Ginsburg--view religion negatively.

Hunter Baker said...

Happy to see the LawJedi here. Great blog you have, sir.

Jake said...

While the Establishment Clause doesn't provide much guidance in this area, it is out of common respect to non-Christians that we should not have these displays. Spiritual proclamations such as these belong on private, not public property.

Otherwise, lets start putting up Satanic commandments ... or how about this for a change ... The Bill of Rights or some other document that is based in freedom and logic instead of intolerance and fairy tales.

Anonymous said...

Based on logic, yes, but that logic uses a creator as an axiom.